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Finding gift for significant other most difficult

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Finding gift for significant other most difficult
Finding gift for significant other most difficult

New York – A survey has revealed that it is indeed most difficult to pick out the perfect gift for one’s significant other.

The survey, which was conducted on 1,000 adult men and women by Ebates.com, found that more than a third of people re-gift during the holidays, and half have a spare gift on hand if they receive an unexpected present, the New York Daily News reported.

According to the shopping website’s survey, both men and women describe their significant other as the hardest person to buy a gift for during the holidays.

The results also showed that couple with higher income found it harder to purchase a gift for their partner.

The survey revealed 39 percent of them have gifted a gift from someone else.

The top gift re-gifting options include home decor, gift cards, wine or champagne, books, perfumes and colognes.

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Washington - While it is widely believed that money can not buy love, a new study has suggested that it can buy you happiness but only up to a ‘sweet spot’ of 36,000 dollars GDP per person. A new analysis led by economists Eugenio Proto in the Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy at the University of Warwick and Aldo Rustichini, from University of MInnesota found that as expected, for the poorest countries life satisfaction rises as a country’s wealth increases as people are able to meet their basic needs. However, the new surprise finding is that once income reaches a certain level – around 36,000 dollars, adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) - life satisfaction levels peaks, after which it appears to dip slightly in the very rich countries. The researchers found suggestive evidence that this happiness dip in the wealthiest countries is because more money creates higher aspirations, leading to disappointment and a drop in life satisfaction if those aspirations are not met. The study was published in journal PLOS ONE.

Money does buy happiness but only up to $36K

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