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44 pc of adults worry e-cigs will encourage kids to smoke tobacco

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Washington – A new study has found that almost half of the parents are worried that e-cigarette devices will encourage their kids to start using tobacco products.

According to the latest University of Michigan Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health, around 44 percent of adults are concerned that kids will try e-cigarettes.

E-cigarettes, which are battery-operated devices that look like cigarettes but don’t burn tobacco, have replaceable cartridges of liquid containing nicotine, which is inhaled as a vapor along with flavors like chocolate, fruit, candy or even tobacco.

In the poll, by Matthew M. Davis, which was administered in November 2013 to 2,124 adults age 18 and over, arguments were presented both for and against e-cigarettes. Then adults were asked for their opinions about the devices and possible regulations and laws.

In the poll, 86 percent of adults said they have heard of e-cigarettes, while only 13 percent have ever tried one. Among parents, 48 percent said they are very or somewhat concerned that their children will try e-cigarettes.

Meanwhile, 65 percent of adults think e-cigarettes should have health warnings like tobacco cigarettes and nicotine products.

Adults also expressed widespread support for new laws regarding e-cigarettes.

About 88 percent think manufacturers should be required to test e-cigarettes for safety and 86 percent favor prohibiting the sale of e-cigarettes to minors. 71 percent of adults support restricting the marketing of e-cigarettes on social networking sites.

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